July 13th, 2005

TessieFetch

The Girl in the Café


HBO's got this film, The Girl in the Café. It's on OnDemand. It's Bill Nighy as a romantic lead with Kelly MacDonald and the G8 Conference in Reykjavik, in a film written by Richard Curtis and directed by David Yates (who'll be doing Harry Potter next).

It's lovely. It's a British Lost in Translation with an Scottish accent. It's funny. It's...well, I started to like him a little as Slartibartfast, but this is the movie that made me really like Bill Nighy.

And it's got lines like this: George's Wife: "Ah, three hours next to the dullest man in Canada... and that's a pretty competitive category. " How can you not love a thing like that?
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    The Girl in the Café
Trick-Snow

Cinderella Man

I can't imagine what the Depression was like. I don't think any of us really can; those of us born in the post-WWII, post-Vietnam Entitlement Age have no idea what it is to skip a meal not because we want to fit into that dress by Saturday but because there was no food to eat.

My parents don't even really know it. Born in 1929 and 1935, they were alive then, but they don't really remember it because they were so young. But, watching Cinderella Man, you feel the Depression so keenly you think you know what it was like at least a little.

It's a Ron Howard movie with Russell Crowe...and while we can see the ending of a Ron Howard film from as far away as we can see the ending of a Speilberf movie, this time it's okay, because it's a true story and we know how it ends.

The cast is excellent. Renee Zellweger is a blend of Roxie Hart from Chicago and Ruby Thewes from Cold Mountain. Russell Crowe is a good daddy and Paul Giamatti manages not to annoy.

I'll admit freely that all I know about boxing and this time period is a scene in Quiz Show, but the period detail in this seems spot on. It's gripping and suspenseful, even though any history book can tell tell the outcome of the film's climactic scene, it's still great to watch unfold. Which I guess is as much as anyone can hope for in a movie.
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    I, Robot